ASTRO Blog

ASTRO’s Minority Summer Fellowships Offer Lasting Connections

By Michael LeCompte, MS

The Committee of Health Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (CHEDI) of ASTRO developed the Minority Summer Fellowship (MSF) as an opportunity to introduce medical students from backgrounds that are underrepresented in medicine to the field of radiation oncology. The program provides a framework for medical students to gain meaningful early exposure to the specialty that both encourages interest and provides mentorship within the field. MSF awardees work with a mentor on a research project and are required to submit their work for presentation at the subsequent ASTRO Annual Meeting. For the 2020 cycle, four students will be offered a package of $5,000: a $4,000 stipend for the eight-week training program and a $1,000 grant toward travel to the 2021 ASTRO Annual Meeting.

I first learned of the MSF through my school’s Student Affairs office. At this point, I had previously shadowed within the Wake Forest Department of Radiation Oncology and had collected data for a few residents’ research projects. I had a basic understanding of certain elements within radiation oncology and was fascinated by all I had seen thus far. Radiation oncology allows physicians to help patients process the uncertainty associated with a cancer diagnosis and build actionable, evidence-based treatment plans. This blend of social support and scientific application resonated with what I was looking for in a specialty, and the MSF was the avenue that would permit me to explore this specialty further.

The MSF allows the recipient to design a research project with a mentor to be completed over the eight-week training program. I was fortunate to find mentors who empowered me to identify my own research questions. Through conversations with Dr. Karen Winkfield and Dr. Michael Chan, we found ways to leverage my prior knowledge within diabetes research and investigate topics I was already personally interested in. This allowed me to more easily take an active role in designing our research project. We investigated the impact of diabetes mellitus and anti-diabetic drugs on the clinical outcomes of brain metastasis patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery. The research completed through this experience was presented at the 2018 ASTRO Annual Meeting and has been published in the Red Journal and the Journal of Radiosurgery and SBRT.

The MSF training program may last for just a summer, but the connections I made during this experience continue to influence my career plans. I was able to make lasting connections with mentors both inside and outside my home institution. During the training program, I continued shadowing Dr. William Blackstock, who has always been there to offer advice and guidance along my path in medicine. Under the guidance of Dr. Chan, I have continued my research in clinical outcomes of brain metastasis patients, specifically the study of the concept of brain metastasis velocity. My project with CHEDI served as a stepping stone to a research experience that has seen me present at the inaugural Conference on Brain Metastases sponsored by the Society of Neuro-Oncology.

CHEDI also provides MSF awardees a liaison. For me, that person is Dr. Christian Okoye of St. Bernards Cancer Center, who has been there to check in on my progress in medical training and offer encouraging words. Other members of CHEDI have also served as mentors. I have been able to discuss my research and career plans with members of CHEDI over phone calls and in person at national meetings. Through mentorship, the MSF helps medical students further develop their career goals and grow toward their true potential.

This experience affirmed my fascination with the specialty and ultimately helped me in choosing to apply for residency in radiation oncology. I cannot express how appreciative I am to the members of CHEDI for offering me this wonderful opportunity, and I encourage others to apply. The application for the 2020 cycle is currently open with a deadline of Friday, February 7, 2020.

Michael LeCompte, MS, is a fourth-year medical student at Wake Forest School of Medicine. He was one of two recipients of the 2017 ASTRO Minority Summer Fellowship Award.

Posted: November 19, 2019 | with 0 comments
Filed under: CHEDI, diversity, fellowships


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