ASTRO Blog

Prior Authorization: Denial by delay

By Vivek Kavadi, MD

"Honestly, why do you need prior authorization for my cancer treatment? It is not elective!" This comment from one of our radiation patients represents the frustrations of many patients across the country. As vice-chair of the Payer Relations Subcommittee (PRC), I frequently receive complaints from ASTRO members about the negative effects that the prior authorization process has on their practice and their patients. In the recent ASTRO Prior Authorization Survey, an overwhelming majority of respondents reported that their patients experience delays in care. Nearly three quarters of these radiation oncologists also said that their patients regularly express concern over these delays.

I work in a cancer center where the radiation treatment area is in the same location as chemotherapy infusion. This provides for seamless coordination and patient convenience. However, when prior authorization for radiation is delayed, treatment with chemotherapy is also delayed. Combined modality treatment requires a lot of coordination. Radiation is daily and many infusions last several days. We often like to start both treatments on a Monday or Tuesday. Recently, treatment starts have become very unpredictable. It is not a rare circumstance where delays of one to two weeks occur due to prior authorization issues.

This issue remains at the forefront for radiation oncologists and the entire house of medicine, which led to ASTRO signing on to the Consensus Statement on Improving the Prior Authorization Process. The Consensus Statement outlines five areas for improvement for prior authorization programs. One area, the message of Transparency and Communication Regarding Prior Authorization, is extremely resonant in our current environment. Prior authorization requirements and rationale must be easily accessible to providers and patients. Perhaps most important, is the area discussing Continuity of Patient Care that emphasizes that prior authorization should not interrupt appropriate medical services, potentially causing harm and distress to patients.

My experiences are not unique; this issue affects us all. Last fall, more than 500 ASTRO members urged their members of Congress to sign the Roe-Bera Prior Authorization Letter, which called on the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) to regulate Medicare Advantage plans’ use of prior authorization and ensure these requirements do not create barriers to care. PRC continues to engage with the American Medical Association and other stakeholders to reform prior authorization practices. ASTRO’s Government Relations team is working with our Hill champions to address prior authorization issues. We frequently provide updates in ASTROgrams and What’s Happening in Washington, so be sure to read those publications.

How has prior authorization impacted the way you practice? Let us know in the comments, or email  healthpolicy1@astro.org.

Posted: April 24, 2019 | with 0 comments


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